Astro Calendar 2021

    JANUARYEVENT
    3 (10AM)Quadrantid meteor shower peak
    8Mercury 1.7deg south of Saturn
    10Mercury, Jupiter and Saturn within 2.3deg in the evening sky
    11Venus 3deg north of the Moon
    Mercury 1.5deg south of Jupiter
    13Mercury, Jupiter and Saturn within 6deg of New Moon
    15Jupiter, Saturn, Mercury and Moon forming 15deg arc in the evening sky
    Saturn will be the lowest planet, near the horizon
    21-22Uranus easy to find, 1.7deg south of Mars (and Moon within 5 deg)
    23Mercury at greatest elongation from the sun (19deg), best time to spot it.
    FEBRUARYEVENT
    6Venus 0.4deg south of Saturn
    10Saturn 3deg and Venus 5deg north of thin crescent Moon
    11Venus 0.4deg south of Jupiter
    18Mars 4deg north of Moon
    13Mercury, Jupiter and Saturn within 6deg of New Moon
    15Jupiter, Saturn, Mercury and Moon forming 15deg arc
    21-22Uranus easy to find, 1.7deg south of Mars (and Moon within 5 deg)
    28Mars within 5deg of the Pleiades open star cluster (Messier 45)

    Recent Posts

    May Lunar Eclipse (Yes a Super Moon)

    I hope that some of you will be taking a few minutes this evening to head outside and glance up at the Moon. Not only is tonight a “Super Moon” but depending where you are, you may find the Moon taking on a red hue due to a lunar eclipse.

    September 27th 2015 Lunar Eclipse

    For tonight’s event, those around the Pacific rim are best located to see the lunar eclipse. On the east coast of North America you might spot the start of the eclipse as the Moon sets in the early morning.

    Location of best viewing. Leah Tiscione / S&T; Source: USNO

    Even if you are not in a favorable spot, take the time to look at the Moon. There’s this timeless element to it, knowing that it’s been there for millions of years and will continue to be there for many more.

    It is also accessible to everyone, no matter how light polluted your sky happens to be.

    The best way to see the Moon is with nothing else but your two eyes. Resist the urge to attempt a photo with your phone. That will only end in frustrations. All photographs of the Moon are heavily processed because it’s very hard for a camera to handle both the brightness of a full Moon and the black of the nuit sky, or the glowing halo shining through the thin clouds. And when you do get the brightness under control, all the subtle details of the Moon’s surface is lost. Your eyes are better equipped to handle the large range of brightness and the resolution to really enjoy the sight.

    Two separate shots and 15 minutes of processing is required for this, yet your eyes can easily see the details in real time.

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